PALLUD LAB

Soil Biogeochemistry & Biogeophysics

Sarick Matzen

Contact: 151 Hilgard Hall

Phone: 510-642-7273

Email: smatzen-at-berkeley.edu

Sarick is researching arsenic phytoremediation using the Chinese brake fern, Pteris vittata. He is interested in helping turn underutilized urban space into food production zones, and sees researching soil remediation as an important part of this process. Sarick is seeking ways to promote P. vittata arsenic accumulation using soil amendments. He is also investigating the potential negative effects of lead on fern arsenic uptake. With this research, Sarick hopes to develop protocols for simultaneous remediation of soils contaminated with lead and arsenic – common co-contaminants in urban as well as rural soils. His work is centered around field studies conducted at the Santa Fe Right-of-Way (SFROW), an out-of-service railroad bed in South Berkeley, where arsenic contamination postponed plans to establish a community orchard. Partnering with Sarick's research at the SFROW field site are several community organizations, including Berkeley's Ecology Center and the Spiral Gardens Community Food Security Project. 

Catherine Pham

catherine pham

Contact: 151 Hilgard Hall

Phone: 510-642-7273

Email: catherinepham-at-berkeley.edu

Catherine studies the uptake and speciation of arsenic in the green, marine alga Ulva sp. to understand arsenic cycling in polluted littoral environments. Her research aim is to investigate the bioavailability and chemical forms of arsenic in algae sampled from contaminated coastal waters in the San Francisco Bay estuary and the Mediterranean Sea in order to understand arsenic cycling in the marine environment. She is characterizing the potential risks arsenic may pose to both ecological and human health as it is transformed into various chemical forms and moves from algae up trophic levels, potentially to fish and humans. Her research also will serve as a basis for the future use of algae in biomonitoring and phytoremediation scenarios related to metalloid contamination in aquatic ecosystems. Catherine was awarded a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship, Foreign Language & Area Studies Fellowship, Geraldine F. Martin Environmental Scholarship, Scientific Chateaubriand Fellowship, James P. Bennett Agricultural Fellowship, Marie-Curie Fellowship, and grants from the UC Global One Health Institute and the Institute of Metals in Biology to support her dissertation research.

Chandra Richards

chandra richards

Contact: 151 Hilgard Hall

Phone: 510-642-7273

Email: cmr5064-at-berkeley.edu

Chandra studies the environmental and biogeochemical controls that drive the kinetics of iron and sulfate reduction in littoral aquatic wetland sediments. This research will elucidate the fate, transport, and transformative processes that factor into Fe cycling, investigate the effects of increased S loadings on the Fe cycle, and illuminate the role that Fe-oxides play in mobilizing or immobilizing toxic metals, such as arsenic, selenium, uranium, and chromium. Her work focuses on three sites in the western United States: Baylands Nature Preserve (Palo Alto, CA), Pescadero Marsh Preserve (Pescadero, CA), and Fraser Experimental Forest (Fraser, CO). These sites represent a range of surficial wetland environments with large concentrations of sulfides and toxic heavy metals in the sediment. She will be measuring the rates of Fe and S reduction using novel flow-through experiments that mimic in-situ conditions. She joined the Pallud Lab in 2011 and was awarded the Bay Area Water Quality Fellowship in 2012 to continue studying wetlands in the San Francisco estuarine system.

 

Linden Schneider

Linden2016 

Contact: 151 Hilgard Hall

Phone: 510-642-7273

Email: lmschneider-at-berkeley.edu

Linden is researching iron cycling in subalpine wetlands in Colorado’s Fraser Experimental Forest. She is interested in how changing climate patterns may influence microbial iron reduction rates and dissolved organic mater flux.  She hopes her research will inform the basic biogeochemical question of carbon stabilization in the terrestrial environment. Linden seeks to leverage biogeochemical systems to create simple solutions to problems involving environmental degradation and pollution. By applying the knowledge she generates in her studies of iron and dissolved organic matter to pollutant fate and transport or alternative technologies, such as microbial fuel cells, she hopes to help the world meet the challenges presented by climate change under a booming global population.





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